Posts tagged "Video"

MINNEAPOLIS — The votes are in and the best drone videos of 2017 have been chosen.

Thirteen aerial content creators were voted on as the winners of the 2017 AirVūz Drone Video Awards.

Moscow Aerial 5K Timelab.pro by Russian drone pilot Timelab.pro was voted the Drone Video of the Year, while Paul Nurkkala won the FPV (First-Person View) Video of the Year for NURK’s Flight of the Year.

Five finalists in 13 different categories were selected by the staff of AirVūz, based on the quality, originality and creativity of the drone video or photograph. All AirVūz content creators had the opportunity to place their votes for which finalists they thought were the best of the best.

The voting concluded on Jan. 21 and the winners were announced on AirVūz Live on Facebook on Feb. 5. Each category winner will receive a plaque, cash and prizes. The categories included: People, Cities, Countries, Landscape, Freestyle FPV, Drone Racing, Tiny Whoop, Animals (including pets), Dronies (selfies taken with a drone), Sports, Originality, Reels and Photo.

For more information about the contest, go to www.airvuz.com/drone-video-awards-2017 or contact Tyler Mason, Director of Public Relations, at tyler@airvuz.com.

A list of the 2017 AirVūz Drone Video Awards winners can be found below:

DRONIE — There Is No One Else by Wellington Visuals

LANDSCAPE — Perspective by Jay Worsley

RACING — Drone Racing Underground by JohnnyFPV

COUNTRIES — “Awaken” Iceland by mikebishop.tv

PEOPLE — This is Yunnan by Face du Monde

ANIMALS — Majestic Beast Nanuk by Florian Ledoux

CITIES — Moscow Aerial 5K Timelab.pro by Timelab.pro

TINY WHOOP — エアリアルヨガスタジオ y+AERO × TINY WHOOP JAPAN by KatsuFPV

FREESTYLE — NURK’s Flight of the Year // Trains, Bridges, Rapids, Mountains, Sunsets, Gapping, Perching, Powerlooping by nurkfpv

SPORTS — Dream… by PilotViking

ORIGINALITY — Cardboard Cadet by chrisxgxc

REEL — Drones are Awesome by ThisIsTilt

PHOTOGRAPHY — Floating in the Unknown by zimydakid

About AirVūz

Since its launch in 2015, AirVūz has become the world’s leading drone video and photography sharing platform and global community for drone pilots and aerial media enthusiasts. Drone enthusiasts worldwide can upload and share videos and photos in unlimited quantity and at no cost. Site users have free access to an ever-growing library of drone media content including easily browsable categories such as travel, extreme sports, golf courses, drone racing, landmarks and more. AirVūz users also have access to original AirVūz content, including the weekly AirVūz News program, profiles of top content creators, product reviews, and how-to information for drone pilots on how to take and edit high quality drone video.

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Quaternium company, the leading European brand of long-endurance multirotors, has set the World Record of Endurance accomplishing a 4 hour 40 minute flight with HYBRiX.20 fuel-electric quadcopter. This flight time beats any former demonstration ever made with an electric, hybrid of hydrogen multicopter.

HYBRiX.20 RPA was designed by Quaternium in 2014 and its first model was built in 2015, demonstrating the viability of hybrid technology to power drones. This innovation solved the main limitation of the VTOL drone market: the lack of flight time. HYBRiX.20 is a fuel-electric aircraft, which means that it is an electric multirotor with a powerful genset based on a 2-stroke engine that keeps the battery charged during flight.

This innovative RPA is already available in several countries for aerial missions such as industrial inspection, ground monitoring or emergency response. “Aerial monitoring is one of the main applications of HYBRiX.20. Quaternium team has developed a system configuration with an advanced camera that enables HYBRiX.20 to perform long-range observation missions” explains Jose Luis Cortes, founder of Quaternium.

Quaternium is looking for partners to expand the applications of HYBRiX drone. If you have an aerial project that requires more than one hour of continuous flight or a related proposal, please contact Quaternium team at info@quaternium.com.

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Previous articleWorld’s First Passenger Drone Ehang 184 Delivers Holiday Gifts

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The 2017 program of Drone Film Festival ANZ presented by SanDisk has announced the
winning films for the year, after a 6 week tour and screening across Darwin, Sydney,
Melbourne, Canberra, Perth, Hobart, Adelaide, Brisbane, Auckland, Christchurch and
Wellington. With 209 total film submissions received, from across 27 countries – the best
drone short films of 2017 are –

BEST DRONE FILM – Mixed Motion Project
Ilko Illiev & Marin Kafedjiiski (Bulgaria)
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Mixed Motion Project by Ilko Iliev & Marin Kafedjiiski – Drone Film Festival ANZ x SanDisk from Drone Film Festival ANZ on Vimeo.

BEST ANZ FILM – Flying With Nature
Sarah Coote (Australia)
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Flying With Nature by Sarah Coote – Best ANZ Film – Drone Film Festival ANZ x SanDisk from Drone Film Festival ANZ on Vimeo.

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY – Acrophobia: I’m Afraid Of Heights
Philippe Woodtli (Switzerland)
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Acrophobia by Philippe Woodtli – Best Cinematography – Drone Film Festival ANZ x SanDisk from Drone Film Festival ANZ on Vimeo.

BEST CONCEPT – Teila Celebration
Lucas Zanotto (Finland)
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Telia – Drones + Cake by Lucas Zanotto – Best Concept – Drone Film Festival ANZ x SanDisk from Drone Film Festival ANZ on Vimeo.

BEST SPECIAL EFFECTS – NightChase
Hadrien Picard (France)
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Night Chase by Hadrien Picard – Best Special Effects – Drone Film Festival ANZ x SanDisk from Drone Film Festival ANZ on Vimeo.

BEST DIRECTION – Cala d’en Serra Drone Parkour
Giles Campbell Longley & Kie Willis (United Kingdom)
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Cala d’en Serra – Drone Parkour by Giles C. Longley & Kie Willis – Best Direction – DFFANZ x SanDisk from Drone Film Festival ANZ on Vimeo.

BEST LANDSCAPE – Australia: The Eagle’s Eye
Nick Robinson (Australia)
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AUSTRALIA: The Eagle Eye by Nick Robinson – Best Landscape – Drone Film Festival ANZ x SanDisk from Drone Film Festival ANZ on Vimeo.

BEST SHOWREEL – KopterCam 2017
KopterCam (Finland)
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KopterCam Showreel by KopterCam – Best Showreel – Drone Film Festival ANZ x SanDisk from Drone Film Festival ANZ on Vimeo.

BEST DOCUMENTARY – Permission To Fly
Vivienne Smith & Erik Nachtrieb (United States)
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Permission To Fly by Viv Smith & Erik Nachtrieb – Best Doco – Drone Film Festival ANZ x SanDisk from Drone Film Festival ANZ on Vimeo.

BEST EXTREME SPORTS – Ice Call: Backyards Project
Antoine Frioux (France)
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Ice Call: Backyards Project by Antoine Frioux – Best Extreme Sports – Drone Film Fest ANZ x SanDisk from Drone Film Festival ANZ on Vimeo.

BEST MUSIC – Drift
Frank Dewaele (Belgium)
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DRIFT by Frank Dewaele – Best Music – Drone Film Festival ANZ x SanDisk from Drone Film Festival ANZ on Vimeo.

PEOPLE’S CHOICE – Let’s Go Shopping
Mark Cocquio (Australia)
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Let’s Go Shopping by Mark Cocquio – People’s Choice – Drone Film Festival ANZ x SanDisk from Drone Film Festival ANZ on Vimeo.

Our jury team included professionals from across the drone, tech, media and creative sector, visit each of the 14 member’s bios at – www.dffanz.com/about/jury

Prizes for the following 12 categories include WD My Passport Wireless Pro 2TB – and
SanDisk 64GB Extreme Pro microSD Card, Lightworks Pro & Graffiti software, Cyberlink
Powerdirector software, SkyTango membership, Henty travel bag accessory.

Best ANZ Film will receive a DJI Mavic Pro drone by Harvey Norman, Flights for two people
to fly from Australia to Thailand to shoot their next drone film, along with spending money
and ten days accommodation, thanks to THAI Airways. Best Cinematography Film will receive a Micro Cinema Camera and a Video Assist 4K by Blackmagic Design. Full prize listing at – www.dffanz.com/prizes

To see the complete official selection of films screened at the DFFANZ 2017 program, head
to our Vimeo page via – www.vimeo.com/dffanz

The 3rd annual edition of Drone Film Festival ANZ presented by SanDisk, will feature drone
fly day demonstrations, guest speaker segments to schools, master class learning programs along with screening the best of 2018 short drone films from across the world. DFFANZ is accepting film submissions from Thursday 01 March 2018 via – www.filmfreeway.com/dffanz

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Lyfted Media is leading the way in bringing a safe alternative to aerial event coverage solutions. Perfect for indoor arena events, the helium filled Aerial UltraLight radio controlled camera platforms are safe for flying above an audience.  Whether for concerts, sporting events, conferences, theme parks, shopping malls or universities Lyfted Media provides a unique and engaging live fan experience.

Featured in the above video, the remote controlled “AirOrbs” or blimp cams have been successfully flown with live broadcast capabilities inside Madison Square Garden. They have now flown over 100 games for the NY Knicks, NY Rangers and NY Liberty. At this level, this is truly a first in the RC flying cameras/drone field. Lyfted Media are looking to take this service to arenas across the US.

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Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), commonly known as drones, are being used in hundreds of practical applications. From aerial photography to agriculture, drones have been adopted by a range of industries.

However, this is just the start, and advances in technology over the next five years will mean UAVs will become a common sight in the skies above most developed countries. Developments in artificial intelligence and smartphone technology will accelerate the use of drones, and it’s difficult to predict how widespread their use will become.

Just as driverless cars are likely to become common on roads in the next five years, unmanned passenger drones are also being tested. It may soon be possible to escape congestion on the ground and take to the air for short journeys, without the need for a pilot. New technology will mean industries where drones are already being used, such as construction, will find wider uses for them.

The following are some of the ways UAVs will enhance life in the future.

Traffic control and road safety

The Federal Highway Administration has tested the use of autonomous drones to monitor congestion on highways and bridges. UAVs can follow pre-programmed flight paths and feed back live data on the volume of traffic. If there’s an accident, a drone can be sent to the scene to monitor the build of traffic and help re-route vehicles to avoid the area. In the future, combining artificial intelligence with traffic monitoring drones means a system could run with little human intervention.

As one of the most densely populated countries in the world, India has serious problems with traffic and congestion. As well as making it difficult to travel, this also creates environmental problems. A pilot is underway using drones to monitor traffic on the Pune-Mumbai Expressway. Local authorities have termed this road a ‘death trap’ due to the high volume of accidents, and it’s hoped drones will help to improve safety. Two UAVs were used initially to monitor traffic on both sides of the road. Fifteen drivers were fined in the first few weeks for cutting lanes, and drones have proved to be far more effective than CCTV monitoring from the ground.

UAVs are also being used on the highways of China to monitor traffic. Driving in the emergency lane to avoid traffic is a common offense, and drones are able to fly low and take a photograph of vehicles doing this. When CCTV cameras spot a vehicle illegally using the emergency lane, a drone is sent to the location. There was some negative reaction to this initially, but drivers now see the safety benefits. Technology enhanced policing using drones will become more common over the next decade.

Medical drones

In some remote parts of the world, UAVs already have practical uses in the field of medicine. They can carry packages containing vaccines, drugs and blood products to isolated areas. Speed is critical when it comes to the availability of medical aid, and drones are able to travel short distances very quickly. Experiments are underway to use UAVs to deliver defibrillators and hemostatic supplies to emergency scenes.

So called ‘ambulance drones’ are being piloted in a number of countries. The Netherlands was one of the first to see the potential for saving lives using UAV technology. As well as their speed advantage, drones can reach remote locations and areas where road conditions make it difficult for vehicles to access. One of the current limitations is that battery life restricts the range of current drones, but innovative solutions are emerging. In the future, aircraft will land themselves at charging points or pass their payload to another drone to complete the journey.

The Silicon Valley start-up Zipline teamed up with the Rwandan government in 2016 to test delivery of medical supplies to hospitals. Five hospitals were involved in a pilot scheme for a year, and this was expanded to cover forty more once it proved successful. Average delivery times in the past could be as much as four hours, and use of drones has reduced this to fifteen minutes. Health workers can place orders by a text message, and supplies travel at high speeds through the air to their medical facility. Flexible airspace laws in Rwanda have helped this operation, but other countries are likely to adapt current regulations in the future.

Disaster and emergency relief

Drones are already being used to search for survivors and help rescue teams in some parts of the world. They are particularly useful in the aftermath of earthquakes, floods and forest fires where sending rescue workers to the scene could put lives at risk. Drone swarms will take disaster relief from the air a stage further in the future. Swarms are able to communicate with each other and act without human involvement. Armed with thermal cameras, a drone swarm could identify the exact whereabouts of survivors and produce a detailed map of a disaster scene.

A pilot by The American Red Cross in Houston is underway to test how useful drones will be in their humanitarian relief programs. Hurricane Harvey presented the perfect opportunity to survey areas affected by a large scale natural disaster. Images and footage captured by UAVs operated for the American Red Cross allowed the organisation to direct relief efforts to where they were needed the most. At the same time, the drones helped to evaluate damage to property and infrastructure for insurance claims. In a combined effort with emergency workers and volunteers, drone technology can accelerate emergency aid.

Use of UAVs in disaster relief relies on state of the art technology. Battery life and quality of images are two key factors in how useful drones can be in these situations. By tethering a UAV to a generator on the ground, the pilot can keep his machine in the air for an extended period. The latest cameras designed for drones have 30X zoom lenses and can capture detailed images from as high as 400 feet above the ground. A drone can be launched within minutes of arrival at the scene of a disaster, and capture images from several miles of the take off point.

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Crime prevention and anti-terrorism

Using UAVs for surveillance and monitoring can be controversial, but there’s no doubt they are of value in protecting citizens from crime and terrorism. Some experts predict drone technology will become a standard tool for law enforcement agencies in the future. UAVs can be used to see places and things that cameras on the ground cannot, so they are ideal for use in stakeouts and crowd surveillance . Being able to fly inside buildings gives drones an advantage over helicopters. In an active shooter situation, drones can provide valuable information about numbers involved, the direction a shooter is heading and possible escape routes for people in the firing line.

Potential for using drones in counter-terrorism operations has been on the agenda since 2013. CCTV footage from fixed positions can be useful in working out what happened after a terrorist attack, but UAVs have the potential to help prevent them happening. Drones of the future could use face recognition software and other technology to identify known terrorists and people carrying weapons. By alerting law enforcement teams on the ground, lives could be saved. In some situations, weaponized UAVs could destroy targets on the ground without the need for ground support.

The idea of using armed drones isn’t new, but it was the 9/11 tragedy that made it an acceptable option in military operations. President Obama scaled up the use of drone technology in counter-terrorism when he took office. A level of secrecy is required around use of UAVs in combat, but there are controls in place in the US to ensure laws of warfare are complied with.

Live entertainment

One of the most exciting future uses of drones is streaming live rock concerts and sports events. Camera cranes are the current tool for getting viewers at home close to the action at events, but these are expensive and difficult to operate at some venues. UAVs make the crane-style shot accessible for all types of events.

A swarm of drones could give viewers on the other side of the world the ability to switch their viewing angle and experience an event as if they were there. Combined with augmented reality and 3D viewing technology UAVs open up a new world when it comes to experiencing live entertainment.

One of the main barriers to more widespread use of drones is regulations around use of airspace. These regulations are likely to adapt as UAV technology improves, and the skies will be open to hundreds of innovative new uses for drones.

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It has been a dream for three years. To finally return to a volcanic eruption. To get back there with proper gear, proper experience and courage. And drones. Ever since the Holuhraun eruption I fought with myself – back in the days I was not prepared. I did not have the right gear (yes, sometimes gear matters), I did not have the right experience. My old Phantom 2 was just not on top of things to capture this event adequately and I was not courageous enough to risk it all.

But not this time. For three years I trained for this moment. For 3 years I practiced, failed and learned. And when our guide Erik told us that the flows in Kilauea will be outside the Volcano National Park boundaries (which is a drone no-fly zone) I was thrilled.

When we hiked to the Pali and the hill came close we could see the red glowing lava in the distance. As we arrived at the foot of the hill suddenly flows started all over the place. Branching into arms, recombining and branching again.

It was the one and only film that made me have tears in my eyes when editing. At this moment I think that the last shot is the best drone shot I ever captured. And I cannot imagine what I could capture on this planet, in this life, that would be on top of this shot.

October 7th, 2017. Kilauea volcano, Big Island, Hawaii. Shot during the trip with my friend @erez
Guide: Kilauea Eco Guides
Gear: Canon 5D Mark IV, Canon 70-200 2.8, DJI Phantom 4 Pro, DJI Mavic Pro

Legal Note: These drone shots were captured outside the Hawaiʻi-Volcanoes National Park NFZ and within FAA drone regulations (line of sight, 400ft, not operated near manned aircraft).

– Daniel Hausmann

We are glad to publish the following press release by our sponsor dronevideos.com

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Summary: Launching the first nationwide network of licensed drone video operators, dronevideos.com offers 4K Ultra HD aerial videography at affordable prices for a variety of commercial and personal uses, orderable online and shot within 24 hours notice.

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Gainesville, VA— DroneVideos.com, the first nationwide network of drone video operators, debuts to make aerial video and still photography available to everyone at affordable prices. All drone packages can be ordered online, and include a fully edited and color corrected 1:00-1:30 video shot in 4K Ultra HD to the customer’s specifications, 10-20 high-resolution still photographs, 48-hour turnaround and a 100% money-back guarantee.

Serving virtually the entire US, DroneVideos.com uses expert drone videographers who are fully insured, licensed and certified, background checked, and conform to all rules and regulations.

Purchasers can order aerial footage and photos for a variety of commercial and personal uses, including

  • dramatic perspectives of real estate for sale
  • mapping or inspection of farms and landscapes
  • panoramas of golf courses and travel destinations
  • roof inspections
  • many other applications

“For the first time, businesses and individuals can get the cinema quality videos they want, without the high cost and difficulty in finding someone they can trust to do it right,” says Chris Jesuele, CEO of DroneVideos.com. “The quality of our drone videos is our utmost priority, which is why I personally oversee and approve each finished video to ensure it’s the best it can be.”

Jesuele stresses the convenience of the DroneVideos.com fully automated website, where visitors can order customized video packages within five minutes, without having to wait for a quote or requiring any technical knowledge, or even having to be present at the shoot. One price covers everything, with never any additional or hidden fees.

Finished videos and photos are presented on a SEO friendly webpage, which can be easily shared on Facebook, Twitter and other social media with a click of a button. No technical skills required.

For more information, or to order aerial video packages, visit DroneVideos.com, where stock video footage can also be purchased. For media inquires, or to inquire about becoming a DroneVideos.com network videographer, call 1-800-303-1783 or email info@dronevideos.com

Stay tuned on the Personal Drones Blog for the latest quadcopter and multirotor news!

MINNEAPOLIS, OCTOBER 18, 2017 — Are you a drone pilot with great videos? Do you want to win awesome prizes?

Upload your work to AirVuz.com to be entered into the 2017 AirVūz Drone Video Awards.

AirVūz, the premier community for drone videos and photography, is launching its first annual contest to celebrate the very best in drone cinematography.

Drone videos and photos on AirVuz.com are viewed by more than 8 million people worldwide monthly. According to Alexa.com, AirVūz is the second most viewed website in the drone industry.

All videos uploaded to AirVuz.com between January 1, 2017 and December 15, 2017 (entries must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. EST) are eligible to win. The contest is open to anyone in the world who uploads an originally shot drone video on AirVuz.com. To submit a drone video, go to AirVuz.com to become a member (the cost is free) and follow the instructions for uploading a video or visit: http://www.airvuz.com/drone-video-awards-2017.

A plaque, cash and prizes will be awarded to winners in 11 categories, which include: People, Cities, Landscape, Freestyle FPV, Drone Racing, Tiny Whoop, Animals (including pets), Dronies (selfies taken with a drone), Sports, Originality, and Reels.

Up to five finalists in each category will be selected by the staff of AirVūz, based on total views, as well as the quality and creativity, of a drone video or photograph uploaded on AirVuz.com in 2017. Videos are only eligible to win in one category. Videos submitted during 2017 will be ineligible to compete in 2018.

Grand Prizes: In addition to 11 category winners, AirVūz will award US$1,000 for the FPV (First-Person-View) Video of the Year and US$1,000 for the Drone Video of the Year. The Drone Photo of the Year will receive US$500. 

All AirVūz content creators will have the opportunity to place their votes for the best drone videos in the world between Monday, Jan. 8, 2018 and Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018 (voting closes at 11:59 p.m. EST). Only one entry per registered content creator will be accepted in the voting for the best drone videos in the world.

“We’re thrilled to be hosting this contest to highlight the amazing work of our content creators from all around the world,” said Megan Gaffney, Vice President of Marketing. “Because there is so much talent in the global drone community, we at AirVūz wanted to reward the skill and creativity of the drone pilots who make our community so special.”

“With more than 15,000 videos submitted in 2017 year to date,” added Gaffney, “the competition will be stiff to find the best drone videos in the world.”

As of October 1, 2017, more than 36,000 videos have been submitted and uploaded on AirVuz.com since the website was launched in 2015.

Winners of the 2017 AirVūz Drone Video Awards will be announced on Monday, February 5, 2018. For more information about the contest, go to www.airvuz.com/drone-video-awards-2017.

About AirVūz

Since its launch in 2015, AirVūz has become the world’s leading drone video and photography sharing platform and global community for drone pilots and aerial media enthusiasts. Drone enthusiasts worldwide can upload and share videos and photos in unlimited quantity and at no cost. Site users have free access to an ever-growing library of drone media content including easily browsable categories such as travel, extreme sports, golf courses, drone racing, landmarks and more. AirVūz users also have access to original AirVūz content, including the weekly AirVūz News program, profiles of top content creators, product reviews, and how-to information for drone pilots on how to take and edit high quality drone video.