Posts tagged "AirVuz"

MINNEAPOLIS — The votes are in and the best drone videos of 2017 have been chosen.

Thirteen aerial content creators were voted on as the winners of the 2017 AirVūz Drone Video Awards.

Moscow Aerial 5K Timelab.pro by Russian drone pilot Timelab.pro was voted the Drone Video of the Year, while Paul Nurkkala won the FPV (First-Person View) Video of the Year for NURK’s Flight of the Year.

Five finalists in 13 different categories were selected by the staff of AirVūz, based on the quality, originality and creativity of the drone video or photograph. All AirVūz content creators had the opportunity to place their votes for which finalists they thought were the best of the best.

The voting concluded on Jan. 21 and the winners were announced on AirVūz Live on Facebook on Feb. 5. Each category winner will receive a plaque, cash and prizes. The categories included: People, Cities, Countries, Landscape, Freestyle FPV, Drone Racing, Tiny Whoop, Animals (including pets), Dronies (selfies taken with a drone), Sports, Originality, Reels and Photo.

For more information about the contest, go to www.airvuz.com/drone-video-awards-2017 or contact Tyler Mason, Director of Public Relations, at tyler@airvuz.com.

A list of the 2017 AirVūz Drone Video Awards winners can be found below:

DRONIE — There Is No One Else by Wellington Visuals

LANDSCAPE — Perspective by Jay Worsley

RACING — Drone Racing Underground by JohnnyFPV

COUNTRIES — “Awaken” Iceland by mikebishop.tv

PEOPLE — This is Yunnan by Face du Monde

ANIMALS — Majestic Beast Nanuk by Florian Ledoux

CITIES — Moscow Aerial 5K Timelab.pro by Timelab.pro

TINY WHOOP — エアリアルヨガスタジオ y+AERO × TINY WHOOP JAPAN by KatsuFPV

FREESTYLE — NURK’s Flight of the Year // Trains, Bridges, Rapids, Mountains, Sunsets, Gapping, Perching, Powerlooping by nurkfpv

SPORTS — Dream… by PilotViking

ORIGINALITY — Cardboard Cadet by chrisxgxc

REEL — Drones are Awesome by ThisIsTilt

PHOTOGRAPHY — Floating in the Unknown by zimydakid

About AirVūz

Since its launch in 2015, AirVūz has become the world’s leading drone video and photography sharing platform and global community for drone pilots and aerial media enthusiasts. Drone enthusiasts worldwide can upload and share videos and photos in unlimited quantity and at no cost. Site users have free access to an ever-growing library of drone media content including easily browsable categories such as travel, extreme sports, golf courses, drone racing, landmarks and more. AirVūz users also have access to original AirVūz content, including the weekly AirVūz News program, profiles of top content creators, product reviews, and how-to information for drone pilots on how to take and edit high quality drone video.

Two Surfer Babes by KaszPhotoCreative

MINNEAPOLIS — Tens of thousands of drone videos from around the world have been narrowed down to a handful of finalists in the first-ever AirVūz Drone Video Awards.

More than 33,000 videos uploaded to AirVuz.com between January 1, 2017 and December 15, 2017 were eligible to be chosen as finalists. The contest was open to anyone in the world who uploaded an originally-shot drone video on AirVuz.com.

A plaque, cash and prizes will be awarded to winners in 13 categories, which include: People, Cities, Countries, Landscape, Freestyle FPV, Drone Racing, Tiny Whoop, Animals (including pets), Dronies (selfies taken with a drone), Sports, Originality, Reels and Photo.

Five finalists in each category were selected by the staff of AirVūz, based on the quality, originality and creativity of the drone video or photograph. Videos submitted during 2017 will be ineligible to compete in 2018.

Grand Prizes: In addition to 13 category winners, AirVūz will award US$1,000 for the FPV (First-Person-View) Video of the Year and US$1,000 for the Drone Video of the Year. The Drone Photo of the Year will receive US$500.

All AirVūz content creators will have the opportunity to place their votes for the best drone videos in the world between Monday, Jan. 8, 2018 and Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018 (voting closes at 11:59 p.m. EST). Only one entry per registered content creator will be accepted in the voting for the best drone videos in the world.

The winners of each category of the 2017 AirVūz Drone Video Awards will be announced on AirVūz Live on Facebook on Feb. 5 at facebook.com/airvuz. For more information about the contest, go to www.airvuz.com/drone-video-awards-2017 or contact Tyler Mason, Director of Public Relations, at tyler@airvuz.com.

The 2017 Drone Video Awards Official Nominees:

DRONIE CATEGORY

There Is No One Else by WellingtonVisuals

Upstream by Brent De Bleser

Helipad Selfie in Shanghai by ASenseofHuber

Frozen boats at Olkhon Island Lake Baikal Russia Dronie – Drone Selfie by wrenee

Beautiful Sunrise Dronie by YoumiTrip

LANDSCAPE CATEGORY

An Imaginary World by Tobias Hägg

Greenland by sfdrones

To The Mystery by Scientik

Perspective by Jay Worsley

Amazon Rainforest by Cristian Dimitrius

RACING CATEGORY

MegaDroneX 2.0 // Cave Race by NurkFPV

Can’t Touch It by NytfuryFPV

Stadium FPV Racing Europe by MetallDanny

Maker Faire, San Mateo. Day 1 by FlyingBearFPV

Drone Racing Underground by JohnnyFPV

COUNTRIES CATEGORY

Aerial Hiperlapses Colombia by Jeffpilotbmx

Winds From Morocco by bbacalhau

“Awaken” Iceland by mike bishop.tv

This Is Romania by The Brothers M

Split & Zadar | Croatia | 4K Drone Video by hamza_mujtaba

PEOPLE CATEGORY

Pilot Madeleine in Hawaii 2017 – Oahu Drone Tour by Ryzone

This is Yunnan by Face du Monde

#ALIVE by Isabellefabre

Philippines | A Place I Call Home by Merr Watson

Byron Bay by Jaxon Roberts

ANIMALS CATEGORY

Majestic Beast Nanuk by florian ledoux

Drone Safari – Kruger National Park by BeemFlights

Flying with Flamingos by Alp Karagulle

Wave Sharin’ is Carin’ by Jaimen

Drones & Tigers by dizifilms

CITIES CATEGORY

Moscow Aerial 5K Timelab.pro by Timelab.pro

Singapore by Fabio Knoll

The Windy City in 4K – Chicago from a New Perspective by Gianlo

Tokyo From Above by BigHeadGreg

Venice Italy by duminciucbogdan

TINY WHOOP CATEGORY

エアリアルヨガスタジオ y+AERO × TINY WHOOP JAPAN by KatsuFPV

How to make people happy with Drones by SeekND FPV

Tiny Whooping the Fountains of Bellagio by Redline

Inductrix Film Festival Winner (Best Story) “Thanksgiving at Grandma’s” by Nick Lang

Tinywhoop Invades Monster Energy’s #Doonies3 by Yubeta.Blv FPV

FREESTYLE CATEGORY

NURK’s Flight of the Year // Trains, Bridges, Rapids, Mountains, Sunsets, Gapping, Perching, Powerlooping by nurkfpv

Motocross Stunts / Explosion / Mayhem by Gespar

Huge Abandoned Hotel in Korea by JohnnyFPV

Stone Eagles’ Flight – NYC drone film festival edition by Gab707

DROP IN PARK FPV DRONE AERIAL FREESTYLE by Red-fpv

SPORTS CATEGORY

UNITED WE RIDE by FourOhFourFilmFactory

Extreme Downhill Freeride Mountain Biking in the High Desert with Da Boys by indo eye

Sports RG Drones in the Brazil by rg drones

Best of windsurfing by RikDingo

Dream… by PilotViking

ORIGINALITY CATEGORY

Beauty and the Beast-Chicago’s Story by Drone Media Chicago

Cardboard Cadet by chrisxgxc

Ludovico Einaudi & Greenpeace “Elegy for the Arctic” by CopterClouds.com

tahiti an Head Over LANDSCAPE 4K NEW ZEALAND TAHITI by damienlair

“Drift” by Kelly’s Heroes

REEL CATEGORY

Drones are Awesome by ThisIsTilt

Brendon Dixon Films 2018 Showreel by Brendon Dixon

Drone Alps Winter 2016/2017 Showreel by dronealps

Summer is Coming – A tribute to travellers by Grim Berge

Demo reel – 2017 by Joe.Images

PHOTOGRAPHY CATEGORY

Two Surfer Babes by KaszPhotoCreative

Floating in the Unknown by zimydakid

Lombard Street in San Francisco by B. Dumas

Plane Cemetery by Deftony83

Lady in Red 2 by Dirka

About AirVūz

Since its launch in 2015, AirVūz has become the world’s leading drone video and photography sharing platform and global community for drone pilots and aerial media enthusiasts. Drone enthusiasts worldwide can upload and share videos and photos in unlimited quantity and at no cost. Site users have free access to an ever-growing library of drone media content including easily browsable categories such as travel, extreme sports, golf courses, drone racing, landmarks and more. AirVūz users also have access to original AirVūz content, including the weekly AirVūz News program, profiles of top content creators, product reviews, and how-to information for drone pilots on how to take and edit high quality drone video.

Image: propwashed.com

Do you have a friend or loved one who’s looking for a drone or some drone accessories under the Christmas tree this year, or stuffed into their stocking?

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), more than 2.5 million drones are in our skies today, with an estimated 7 million drones in the air by 2020. Clearly, whether for fun or for commercial use, drones are becoming a regular fixture in our day-to-day lives.

So, if you’re looking for gift ideas for the drone enthusiast in your life, AirVūz, the world’s largest online community for drone videos and photography, has created the ultimate holiday gift ideas list. From small items to entry-level drones, the list offers a wide range of gift ideas to fit just about any budget.

“From stocking stuffers to gifts costing $100 or more, we’ve got you covered,” says Megan Gaffney, Vice President of Marketing for AirVūz, “Based on an unscientific poll of our staff and top drone enthusiasts, these are the gifts that the drone enthusiast in your life will want the most.”

Stocking Stuffers ($5-$10 + small items)

●      Spare drone props (DJI Phantom 4, DJI Mavic), $8 – for a pilot who already has a Phantom or Mavic drone but could always use some extra props.

●      Battery straps for FPV racing drone, $5.49 – the perfect gift for the first-person view (FPV) pilot who loves drone racing.

Drone Gift Ideas Under $25

●      AirVuz shirts and hats, $20-$25 – with more than 1.25 million content creators and fans, AirVūz is the world’s most popular online community for drone enthusiasts. Time to join the fun.

●      1-year subscription (6 issues) to Rotor Drone Magazine, $19.99 – for those who want to read up on the latest drone products and news.

●      Eachine flying Santa Claus drone, $21.99 – the perfect gift for people of all ages who love Santa and drones.

Drone Gift Ideas Under $50

●      MicroSD card for drone footage, 64 GB, $32.99 – for the drone pilot who needs a high-quality memory card for their footage.

●      Hoodman drone launch pad, $39.95 (for small launch pad; larger sizes available) – for someone with a Mavic or Spark drone who wants to launch and land safely.

●      Syma X5C-1 drone, $46.88 – a good entry-level camera drone for the person who wants to try drone piloting and filming their first drone videos.

Drone Gift Ideas Under $100

●      Polar Pro video camera filters – Polar Pro offers filters for many types of drones, including the most popular models, the DJI Mavic, DJI Phantom 4 and GoPro Karma. High quality camera filters are perfect for drone pilots who want to enhance their drone video footage.

●      Blade Inductrix, $69.99 – this mini-drone, the size of a fist, is a great choice for entry-level drone pilots, as well as drone enthusiasts who want to fly indoors.

●      Eachine EV800 FPV goggles, $89.99 – for drone racing pilots who need a headset to enhance their drone racing experience.

Drone Gift Ideas Over $100 

●      DJI Spark, $499 – a great starter drone for people with limited or no drone piloting experience.

●      Blade Inductrix FPV, $199 – great choice for drone pilots who want to dip their toes into the FPV world, otherwise known as drone racing.

●      Drone case from Go Professional Cases – cases available for nearly every model to safely store and transport your drone.

●      Adobe Creative Cloud subscription – the best software package for editing drone video.

●      RemotePilot101 course to study for FAA Part 107 test ($149, good for life) – a prep course for those who would like to earn a license to fly a drone for commercial uses.

For more holiday gift ideas for the drone enthusiast in your life, as well as to view the top drone video in the world, visit www.airvuz.com.

About AirVūz

Since its launch in 2015, AirVūz has become the world’s leading drone video and photography sharing platform and global community for drone pilots and aerial media enthusiasts. Drone enthusiasts worldwide can upload and share videos and photos in unlimited quantity and at no cost. Site users have free access to an ever-growing library of drone media content including easily browsable categories such as travel, extreme sports, golf courses, drone racing, landmarks and more. AirVūz users also have access to original AirVūz content, including the weekly AirVūz News program, profiles of top content creators, product reviews, and how-to information for drone pilots on how to take and edit high quality drone video.

MINNEAPOLIS (July 2017) – Last year, over 200 million people loaded more than 24 billion selfies onto Google servers.

In short, everyone is taking selfies.

If you’re among those who think selfies are old news, here’s a new twist on how to take selfies to new heights. Literally.

It’s called the “dronie,” and drone operators have been doing it for a while.

That’s right, a dronie is a photo or video of yourself, but instead of a phone camera you’re using a drone equipped with a video camera.

Dronies are the “in” thing among drone enthusiasts, says Tyler Mason, director of digital media for AirVūz (www.airvuz.com), an international website dedicated to sharing drone videos. While AirVūz features tens of thousands of drone videos capturing beautiful landscapes and death-defying extreme sports enthusiasts, the website has noticed a dramatic increase in the number of drone videos starring the operators and their friends uploaded to its website.

In fact, to organize this “genre” of drone videos, AirVūz has added a specific category called “People/Dronies” dedicated to collecting footage of this type.

The dronie is something like a rite of passage for drone operators. The footage signals a specific amount of skill that not many first-timers have. It takes considerable practice to be comfortable flying a drone around yourself and other people.

“Shooting a drone video that people want to watch takes a great deal of skill in operating your drone,” says Mason. “Taking a dronie is no easy feat. It takes a lot of control, especially if it involves an element of action, such as running or biking.”

While dronies may not make their debut on the red carpets of Hollywood or the White House any time soon, if you’re ready to take your selfies to the next level, here are some tips from Mason on how to achieve the perfect dronie:

  1. Drone model matters. Smaller, recreational drones are easiest to use when taking a dronie, according to Mason. This rule of thumb is even more important if you’re new to operating a drone. A smaller drone will allow you to have more control for maneuvering in those close-range of yourself and your friends. Mason cautions newbies to drones: “You don’t need a big, top-of-the-line drone to do recreational filming.”
  2. Know where you can fly, and where you can’t. In some places, it might be wise to just pull out your smartphone to commemorate a location. However, beautiful locations such as state and national parks may not allow drones. And, if you’re anywhere near an airport, FAA regulations are another thing to worry about. Ignorance or disregard for local air authority can lead to confiscation, hefty fines or even arrest. That’s where a smart phone may still be the best way to capture a selfie. 
  1. Know your limits; be safe. Though you may want to capture the coolest dronie ever conceived by mankind, don’t take any risks with yourself or others. Always be in control of your drone, especially when it’s near yourself or other people. Biking, boarding, or other activities that make you do more than fly your drone may not be the best idea. 
  1. Define your personal dronie style. See what has been done on AirVuz, and distinguish yourself by inventing your own dronie style. Incorporate your travels and your interests to make your dronies adventurous and unique. Whether you utilize specific pans, fly the drone around your head before taking off into the distance or wear a certain hat in your dronies, creative expression will make them artistic and distinguishable. After all, a dronie is all about you. 
  1. Have your friends join in. Use your favorite people to help you tell a story about yourself or your location. If you’re in a particularly scenic area, spread your friends throughout a planned flying route so not only is your audience seeing the different aspects of the terrain, but also different people during the video. Use the drone to follow a Frisbee pass, then pan up to the landscape, or record an activity you and your friends enjoy in an artistic way.

To learn more about drone videos, visit the AirVūz blog.

About AirVūz LLC

Since its launch in 2015, AirVūz has become the premier online destination place where drone enthusiasts worldwide can upload and share videos and photos taken by professional and amateur drone pilots. With more than 28,000 drone videos, users can experience drone video of travel destinations, extreme sports, golf courses, drone racing, natural wonders, landmarks, cityscapes, and more. AirVūz users also have access to original AirVūz content, including the weekly AirVūz News program, and how-to information for drone pilots on how to take and edit high quality drone video. To learn more, visit www.airvuz.com.

With more than 25,000 drone videos posted on airvuz.com, our team has had the opportunity to view some incredible — and not so incredible – drone videos.

Nearly all of the videos posted on AirVūz come from outside contributors, including professional cinematographers as well as individuals hired to shoot drone video of golf courses, real estate, college campuses, travel destinations, and the like. But, the vast majority of our contributors are drone enthusiasts who are looking for another way to capture the excitement of piloting a drone. Like attaching a GoPro camera to your helmet when you’re downhill skiing or skydiving, there’s something very rewarding about not only capturing a drone flight on video, but sharing it with others, especially those who appreciate your piloting skills.

Because we’re very curious about numbers at AirVūz, we, like most humans would naturally do, gravitate to the drone videos that get the most views.

However, views can be affected by a number of factors, such as the number of friends that a drone pilot has on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and other social media. Or, the topic – as you can imagine, there are just some topics or categories that get more attention on AirVūz than others.

What our team has come to appreciate are those drone videos that are simply compelling in their own right. These are videos that you watch over and over or you share with others because they are addicting to view. They’re just cool. For a few minutes, they take you somewhere else and leave you wondering for days or weeks later.

So how can you create a drone video like that?

Here are seven tips that we’ve compiled based on our review of more than 25,000 videos to help you make more awesome drone videos, and get you more attention on AirVūz:

  1. Practice your Drone Piloting. This probably goes without saying, but the more you practice at safely operating your drone, the better your drone videos will become. Being able to maneuver your drone, regardless of weather conditions or obstacles, and at various speeds, will help create the visual dynamics that keep people’s eyes glued to your drone video. If your drone video appears smooth, you’re on the right track. And of course, propeller shots in your drone video are not good.
  2. Build Your Story. Instead of searching for a story in the video you’ve just shot, think about telling a story and then go shoot the video. For example, instead of shooting drone video of surfers, couldn’t you focus your story by just shooting drone video of the finest women surfers in Southern California and telling their story? Check out the Best of Show winner from this year’s New York City Drone Film Festival––the Mixed Motion Project (MMP3)––which takes the viewer on an incredible ride watching individuals running through city landscapes and jumping from building to building. Mixed with an incredible soundtrack, it’s absolutely captivating to watch.
  3. A Different Perspective. Before you go out and shoot your next drone video, make sure to study the drone videos on AirVūz. Make a mental note not of what has been shot, but what hasn’t. Is there an angle that hasn’t been shot yet?  For example, imagine shooting a video of a person running through the countryside. Certainly you could shoot overhead, but could you shoot at eye level?  From the side?  Looking up?  To me, a great example of this is Base Jumping in Norway, a drone video by PilotViking. It will absolutely take your breath away, primarily because the drone video captures the cliff jumpers at multiple angles.
  4. Grab Attention in the First 3-5 Seconds. Whatever your subject, you need to grab the attention of your audience immediately! If your video lollygags, people will click out. From an intriguing start, you need to keep rewarding your viewer throughout the video with shots that want to keep them glued to the screen. A great example is Drone&Tigers by David Etienne Durivage. It never lets up! One hint: Don’t spend too much time on the title sequence at the beginning of the video. Save the credits for the end of the video.
  5. Not Too Short; Not Too Long. While there is not a magic length we’ve noticed among the successful videos on AirVūz, we can say that videos that are too short are unsatisfying. Videos that are too long can test the viewer’s patience. So what is the Goldilocks solution? Depending upon the quality of your video and the story, we’d suggest keeping your videos between two and four minutes, about the length of a catchy song.  If you have a ton of drone video on the same subject, we’d suggest boiling down to the best of the best shots, and/or breaking it up into a series of videos.
  6. Keep It Authentic. There’s a sweet spot that we’ve noticed between a poorly edited amateur video and a slick, overproduced drone video. The deeper you get into creating drone videos, for fun or for work, the more you realize that this is an art form. People share videos that are not only relevant, but authentic. Choosing the right music and the use of titles (and other words) throughout the video also play an important role in finding the sweet spot. And, don’t forget to share the story behind the story. In Woodland Refuge, the contributor, ZonieLand, shares some notes about the making of this drone video which provides some extra context behind the mesmerizing images.
  7. Experiment! Don’t worry about making the perfect drone video. Just get out there and shoot! Perfection comes from trying and––at times––failing. The more you do it, the better you become. Welcome comments and criticism from friends, family members, co-workers, and from other drone enthusiasts. The main thing is to just have fun and think about your drone video filming like a big laboratory where you get to experiment and try out new ideas. That’s what it’s all about.

At AirVūz, we’re trying to build a great community on the Internet for posting and sharing of drone videos. We want to see everyone who posts a drone video on our website feel proud of their accomplishments, and more importantly, to learn from each other. Besides studying the videos on our website, we urge drone enthusiasts to check out the Blog on AirVūz, which features stories and tips on how to make drone videos.

MINNEAPOLIS (May 16, 2017) — AirVūz, the premier video-sharing site for drone video and photographs, is partnering with the Intrepid Museum of Sea, Air, and Space in New York City to present a new exhibit called Drones: Is the Sky the Limit?

The drone exhibit, open from May 10 to Dec. 3, 2017, explores the history of drone technology, from the earliest unmanned flying machines to advanced systems of the 21st century. A variety of drones, historical artifacts, model airplanes and rare videos will be on display.  The exhibit programming will also host forums discussing drone-related topics, from investing in drones to the evolution of drone technologies and capabilities.

One of the most amazing aspects of the exhibit is video captured by drone cameras in the museum’s “immersion” theater, where visitors will be treated to stunning aerial footage from various locations and situations from throughout the world.

The video is provided by drone-flying community members, including those who have shared videos through AirVūz. The trailer showcases small portions of the astonishingly beautiful views to be shown in the Intrepid theater. The video for both the trailer and the feature film was curated from AirVuz content creators and videos available on the site.

“We are proud to be part of this exhibit,” said Michael Israel, founder and CEO of AirVūz. “This exhibit not only demonstrates the amazing potential of drones, but how drones are becoming part of our everyday lives.”

The exhibit, Drones: Is the Sky the Limit? is made possible by the DJI drones, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE) Foundation, and the New York Council on the Arts. Admission to the exhibit is free with regular admission to the Intrepid Museum.

About AirVūz LLC

Since its launch in 2015, AirVūz has become the premier online destination place where drone enthusiasts worldwide can upload and share videos and photos taken by professional and amateur drone pilots. With more than 25,000 drone videos, users can experience drone video of travel destinations, extreme sports, golf courses, drone racing, natural wonders, landmarks, cityscapes, and more. AirVūz users also have access to original AirVūz content, including the weekly AirVūz News program, and how-to information for drone pilots on how to take and edit high quality drone video. To learn more, visit www.airvuz.com.

There’s no question about it – drone videos are capturing the public imagination. But the videos that make it into mainstream media are just the tip of the iceberg, and not even the best ones out there. If you’re looking for top quality aerial videos, they can be hard to find amidst all the noise and clutter of the major media outlets, and even sites like YouTube. Enter AirVuz, a site dedicated to aerial videos. We interviewed AirVuz CEO Mike Israel to find out more.

Tell us a little about yourself and your background. What inspired AirVuz?

I spent most of my career in the private equity investment industry, most recently with a Minneapolis-based company called Mill City Capital L.P. which I co-founded.  I had a longstanding personal interest in radio controlled flight which morphed into an interest in drones when consumer camera drones first became available a few years ago.  This in turn led to an investment in a large radio control products company which Mill City made about three years ago with which I am still involved.  In the course of working with this company, I came up with the idea of creating an online video sharing platform which would be focused entirely on drone video content.  I started AirVuz in mid-2015 and the team that is in place here now has created what is now the leading drone video sharing platform.

What has the process of development been like, obstacles and successes?

While we have certainly had our share of challenges, fortunately we haven’t had to face any existential crises since the business launched. The initial version of the site had its share of functionality issues, but our IT team basically re-built the site from the ground up and we re-launched it in early June of 2016. It’s a credit to our development team that we’ve been able to continually add new functionality to the site and have had no major instances of the site being down or other issues of that magnitude. I think from the beginning we saw very strong acceptance by the drone user community and have had a steady (albeit growing) stream of very high quality video uploads.

What was more challenging in some ways was finding an audience of viewers for this content – people who come to the site to view the content who may not ever actually create content of their own. It took some time to figure out how to identify the target audience, bring them to the site, and keep them coming back. What we’ve found is that many of our site visitors don’t necessarily have a pre-existing interest in drones but they like the content. Figuring out how to identify that audience, how to get them to visit the site and actually “stick around” long enough to become recurring users has taken some time. While it’s still a work in progress (and always will be), we seem to have been able to connect with a worldwide audience of people who truly enjoy watching this type of content.

A related challenge has been optimizing the user experience on the site. We have made great strides here but ongoing improvement in the user experience is one of the main areas where we are spending our development dollars. It’s coming up with smartphone native apps (we are weeks away from releasing an Android app and an iOS app will be coming right on the heels of that), a tablet app/video editor (later this year), etc. It’s continuing to improve the overall user experience on the site – geotagging (already in place for uploads and user interface to search based on geo-tagging) is coming too.  Fortunately we can do all this without needing armies of programmers – by leveraging the Amazon Web Services infrastructure for the video encoding and playback we can focus on the user-facing features of the site and the related mobile apps.

Who is AirVuz for? What advantages does it offer over sites like YouTube and Vimeo?

AirVuz was really created for people around the world who create and/or enjoy viewing aerial videos created by multirotor drones and other unmanned aerial vehicles such as flying wings. That is the core community. It certainly bears some similarity to YouTube and Vimeo but there are some very important differences too. These differences really all stem from the fact that AirVuz is about a particular type of video content – ie, content captured by drones. The commonality of the content and the shared interest of the community in drones lets AirVuz to do things which would never make sense for the universal platforms. While drone video content is readily available on YouTube and Vimeo, it accounts for a tiny share of the total content on those sites and so both the content and the contributors tend to get “lost” in the sheer volume of unrelated content on those sites.

AirVuz exists in large measure to promote the best contributors and the best content. We continually curate the content to be able to highlight the very best, and we treat the contributors who produce the best quality content like the stars that they are. We have a Facebook fan base of over 1 million and over 50k followers on Instagram, and we use those social media outlets to promote the best contributors and their content off the site via posts and ads. We also have created a whole series of original programming concepts which all relate to the core idea of the site being 100% about drone video content and give us a chance to “show off” the community’s top contributors and their content to a broader audience. These series include Drone Dish (a “talk show” type format where we interview our star contributors and give them a chance to talk about their best videos which are played as overlay), Behind the Goggles (a similar type of show but with the subject matter being FPV pilots and FPV videos), Droning America (a travel show where we travel to various cities around the US and have top local aerial videographers in those cities give in effect aerial tours of their city), YourVuz (a monthly hosted show based on a thematic contest in which community members submit videos to enter – sort of an “America’s Funniest Videos” but for drone), and Drone Trippin’ (a travel-type show featuring some of the world’s top FPV pilots).  We also have an AirVuz News program which covers broader stories involving the world of drone but which is focused on stories with a video angle.

Which video/s on AirVuz is your favorite and why?

They are all my favorites 🙂  In all seriousness I spend many hours on the site every week and I do so because I love the content. We have incredible content being uploaded to this site every week from all corners of the world, and I honestly would have a hard time picking even the top 50 let alone a smaller group. We have videos people have taken flying over live volcanoes. We have a video from one of our contributors in Turkey who somehow managed to fly his drone over a partially submerged submarine cruising through the Straits of Bosporus near Istanbul. Videos from base camps in the Himalayas. We had a video uploaded a few weeks ago which included footage a guy took flying an FPV racing drone off a cruise ship; he got the drone in the wake of this huge ship and was basically chasing his own ship. We have a contributor in Florida who gets together with her friends and makes these unbelievably creative music videos using drones. It goes on and on and on, and literally every day we get uploads which make my jaw drop. This is content which was literally beyond the realm of possibility as recently as a few years ago; it wasn’t that it was prohibitively expensive because you needed full scale aircraft; it simply couldn’t be done at all.

What is your vision for AirVuz over the next year? How do you envision your company helping to promote and develop the drone industry?

Our vision for AirVuz is to have AirVuz be the “go to” place for drone videos and the people who create them. We see huge numbers of people getting into aerial videography for the first time and any of them either aspiring to become or in many cases already becoming professionals. While we have a worldwide user base and much of the content is from outside of the US. The recent changes to the US rules regarding commercial drone use are going to provide a huge impetus to these people, and we want AirVuz to become the place where they and their content live. We intend to provide our community members with multiple means to monetize their content, be it for stock licensing or simply for being a place where they can be discovered and hired for commercial work. We intend to bring in advertiser-partners who will work with our community members to create sponsored content, essentially ads that don’t look or feel like ads. The easy examples would be travel: a spectacular drone video of XYZ resort in Bali is an ad for the resort, it’s an ad for Bali, it’s an ad for anything else that is in the video.

It goes beyond travel though; this concept works for cars, it works for ski equipment, it works for surfing equipment, it works for golf courses.  If it’s visible from 50 or 100 or 400 feet in the air, it generally looks better from that perspective.  We intend to work with our star contributors – the ones we promote on and off the site, the ones we feature in our original programming, the FPV racers we sponsor – to mutually benefit from these arrangements. Everybody can win including the advertisers who can get powerful brand integration that isn’t subject to ad blocking because the “ad” and the “content” are the same thing.

At the same time we intend (at the appropriate time) to be an advertising conduit for the drone industry; if you watch a video that was taken with a certain type of drone or using certain types of accessories, many of the viewers on our site are going to want to know what was used and how to buy it.  Unobtrusive links on the appropriate videos can serve that purpose, and everyone (including the contributor) can benefit from that.

A drone is flown for recreational purposes in the sky above Old Bethpage, New York on September 5, 2015. Bruce Bennett | Getty Images

MINNEAPOLIS, Dec. 19, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — You just got your first drone. Maybe it’s a gimballed camera drone like the new DJI Mavic or the DJI Phantom 4 Professional, or maybe it’s a racing drone.  You learned to fly it and take your first drone video.  Now what?

If you want to share your video with other drone enthusiasts, your best bet is to upload it to a video sharing platform.  Robust platforms like YouTube and Vimeo have countless impressive content creators, but with such an extremely wide variety of content and contributor interests, will your video be seen by your fellow drone enthusiasts?

At AirVūz.com, you can guarantee your drone footage is reaching the right audience.

AirVūz is a video-sharing platform that is dedicated exclusively to drone and aerial videos. With categories ranging from travel to golf courses to sporting events to drone racing, AirVūz provides the perfect place for every drone pilot to upload their videos for fans of drone content to see it.

If you just received your first camera-equipped drone and are not even sure what to shoot, AirVūz is a one-stop shop for inspiration. The collection of videos from all over the world will transport you to the Alps, Norway, the sky above, Bali and so many other amazing locations.

AirVūz offers several unique and exclusive perks only available to their users.  At AirVūz, you’ll never have to sit through ads before viewing a spectacular drone video. Better yet, AirVūz is always completely free to use, regardless of how many videos you upload.

A premiere aspect of AirVūz is the community of like-minded, creative pilots, videographers and aerial footage enthusiasts and plenty of viewers who simply enjoy seeing the world from a different perspective even if they aren’t drone pilots themselves. AirVūz users are there because they’re passionate about shooting, watching and chatting about drone videos.

AirVūz is passionate about these videos too. The site promotes user-uploaded footage to the AirVūz community through AirVūz.com and through the large social media audience. AirVūz currently has over 1 million fans across Facebook and Instagram. Both platforms are used daily to promote the best of the best drone content uploaded by AirVūz community members.

AirVūz builds upon this community with a series of original programming concepts to entertain and guide you on your drone experience.

Want to see the best footage and hear about some of the best pilots? Check out “The Drone Dish” and “Droning America,” featuring the best cinematic drone video contributors, and “Behind the Goggles” and “Drone Trippin’” for some of the world’s top first person view (FPV) drone racers.

For the latest drone news, click “AirVūz News” to see breaking stories and updates involving the AirVūz community.

AirVūz can help you get hired for paid work. Simply activate a “Hire Me” button on your profile page to allow users to contact you for paid work.

Now that you’re in the know, check out AirVūz.com.